boodles and tonic plz

https://www.etsy.com/shop/TheYarnmaiden

621,464 notes

sandflake:

I dearly wish that people would view their bodies as they view flowers…

Veins everywhere?

image

gorgeous~

Skin patches? Birthmarks?

image

hella rad~

Scars? Stretch marks?

image

beautiful~

Freckles? Moles? Acne scars?

image

heckie yeah~

Large? Curvy?

image

lovely~

Small? Thin?

image

charming~

Missing a few pieces?

image

handsome as ever~

Feel like you just look weird?

image

you’re fantastic looking~

(via tehhufflepuffcompanion)

124,306 notes

stfuconservatives:

antiprolife:

Things that lower abortion rates:

  • Better access to condoms
  • Accessible birth control 
  • Accessible Plan - B pills
  • Comprehensive sex education

Things that do not lower abortion rates:

  • Abstinence-Only sex education
  • Banning contraceptives
  • Shaming people who have sex or get abortions
  • Making abortion illegal

Friendly daily reminder that the entire pro-life movement is basically pointless and counterproductive

(Source: , via strangedarling)

228 notes

fashionsfromhistory:

Day Dress

c.1885

United States

This dress belonged to Amelia Beard Hollenback (1844-1918), wife of the prominent financier and philanthropist John Welles Hollenback (1835-1927). In 1874, the Hollenback family settled in the neighborhood of Clinton Hill in Brooklyn. In the 19th century, Brooklyn became a metropolitan center with numerous affluent neighborhoods and a thriving downtown shopping district. Like many of the garments in Hollenback gift, this dress was most likely custom-made by a Brooklyn-based dressmaker. The unusual color and intriguing use of solid and striped wool fabric in this day dress has a folkloric aesthetic, which may have been inspired by an Amelia Hollenback’s travels through the Southwest. The inventive asymmetrical draping shows a high level of sophistication and design sensibility that was atypical for a day dress. (X)

MET

(via brierobbie)

8 notes

coryander:

I have been in Vermont for many days now, and I have been so enamored by the beauty of this state that I have become derelict in sharing photos and stories here. Overall the trail has been quite hikeable except for when the clouds dumped rain upon the land in which case I played a game called “don’t step in the lava” to fend off frustration. More importantly, the food has been quite eatable for me in Vermont compared to other trail states. Access to gluten-free trail food has been easier, and the food has been more delicious. A special shoutout to Qu’s Whistle Stop in North Clarendon, Vermont for
the amazing pancakes, muffin, and roll to accompany my coffee, eggs, bacon, and home fries on my birthday. Oh, I also had a black raspberry milkshake. It was a huge and delicious birthday breakfast, and the people/place made it a true trail gem.

The woods are getting lovelier, darker, and deeper as I traverse further north, and my excitement is building as I get closer and closer to Mt. Katahdin.

3,019 notes

prynnette:

Eva Mirabal wasn’t just the first female Native American cartoonist—she was one of the first Native American cartoonists period, and one of the first female creators to have her own strip. Born Eah-Ha-Wa (“Fast Growing Corn” in the Tiwa language), Mirabal grew up surrounded by art: her father served as an artists’ model, she spent years studying art at the Santa Fe Indian school under director Dorothy Dunn, who recognized her “ability to translate everyday events into scenes of warmth and seminaturalistic beauty” right off the bat, and at nineteen was featured as part of a gallery exhibition in Chicago. World War II brought her work to a wider audience when, after enlisting in the Woman’s Army Corps in 1943, she was commissioned to create a strip for the Corps newsletter. G.I. Gertie gave canny, irreverent voice to women in the military, and Mirabal was quickly commissioned for more work, most notably her posters advertising war bonds. After the war, she served as an Artist-in-Residence at Southern Illinois University, painted murals for schools, planetariums, and military facilities, and eventually returned to the Taos Pueblo. Her later works, signed not as Eva Mirabal but as Eah-Ha-Wah, depict everyday Pueblo life with uncommon passion and candor.

Today, Eva Mirabal is far from celebrated. You’re really only going to find the same G.I.Gertie strip over and over again if you search online, many of her murals have been demolished, and her tumblr tag is empty. But her work—intimate, warm, and keenly felt—stands strong, decades after her death. The comics and art world stand in sore need of women like Mirabal: G.I. Gertie was not the work of a male cartoonist, cracking jokes about those silly women and their silly woman concerns, nor are her paintings the product of a white observer, smearing his bias across a community he “discovered.” Mirabal was a woman writing for women, a member of the Taos Pueblo creating for the Taos Pueblo—an artist committed to her world and its validity.

(Third in a series on women in the comics industry.) 

(via potatofarmgirl)